10 Best Aquarium Manufacturer

Updated on: June 2021

Best Aquarium Manufacturer in 2021


Shark Byte

Shark Byte
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

The Reef Aquarium, Vol. 3: Science, Art, and Technology

The Reef Aquarium, Vol. 3: Science, Art, and Technology
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Marine Color SUNSUN Aquarium Canister Filter UV Quartz Sleeve HW3000 HW-3000 Replacement Glass UV Tube, Manufacturer Directly Original Spare Part

Marine Color SUNSUN Aquarium Canister Filter UV Quartz Sleeve HW3000 HW-3000 Replacement Glass UV Tube, Manufacturer Directly Original Spare Part
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

AQUPON Aquarium Polishing Filter Pad 100 Micron - Ultimate Media Pads - Cut to Fit 24" by 36" - for Fish Tanks, Aquaculture, Hydroponics - USA Manufacturer (1 Pack)

AQUPON Aquarium Polishing Filter Pad 100 Micron - Ultimate Media Pads - Cut to Fit 24
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • FILTERS FINE PARTICLES - Our 100 Micron Polishing Filter Media Pad traps very large to very fine particles and cleans your water quickly. You will have crystal clear water.
  • CUT TO FIT & SAVE MONEY - This 24" by 36" filter pad can easily cut to size to use. This will SAVE A LOT OF MONEY rather than using pre-cut filter media.
  • REUSABLE FILTER PAD - This pad can be used several times to even save more money simply rinse and reuse it.
  • HIGH QUALITY FILTRATION - Aqupon is committed to provide high quality aquarium filter equipment within a great price range. This polishing filter pad is reliable, strong and durable. Made in USA!
  • 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEE - Our ultimate bulk of polishing filter is made for you. If for ANY REASON you are not happy with our filters, please contact us and we will do whatever it takes to make sure that you are 5-STAR HAPPY with us!

API FRESHWATER MASTER TEST KIT 800-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water Master Test Kit

API FRESHWATER MASTER TEST KIT 800-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water Master Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API FRESHWATER MASTER TEST KIT 800-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water Master Test Kit, including 7 bottles of testing solutions, 1 color card and 4 glass tubes with cap
  • Helps monitor water quality and prevent invisible water problems that can be harmful to fish and cause fish loss
  • Accurately monitors 5 most vital water parameters levels in freshwater aquariums: pH, high range pH, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate
  • Designed for use in freshwater aquariums only
  • Use for weekly monitoring and when water or fish problems appear

Lily Bloom Luggage Designer Pattern Suitcase Wheeled Duffel Carry On Bag (22in, Aquarium Life)

Lily Bloom Luggage Designer Pattern Suitcase Wheeled Duffel Carry On Bag (22in, Aquarium Life)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Lightweight construction to make your travel less cumbersome
  • Ergonomic handles that makes for a comfortable grip that won't hurt your hand
  • The fully lined interior has organizational pockets to keep your belongs tidy
  • Fits easily in most airline overhead compartments
  • This product has a five year manufacturer's warranty, so you can rest at ease

SeaClear 50 gal Acrylic Aquarium Combo Set, 36 by 15 by 20", Cobalt Blue

SeaClear 50 gal Acrylic Aquarium Combo Set, 36 by 15 by 20
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Combo includes aquarium, reflector and electrical 24" light fixture
  • Acrylic aquariums are clearer than glass, 17 times stronger, and only half the weight!
  • More impact resistant and less prone to chipping or cracking than glass, making it safer around children and pets
  • Safe for Salt or Freshwater
  • You won't believe how your fish and decorations will pop when viewing this beautiful SeaClear aquarium

Beamswork DA 6500K 0.50W Series LED Pent Aquarium Light Freshwater Plant Discus (180cm - 72")

Beamswork DA 6500K 0.50W Series LED Pent Aquarium Light Freshwater Plant Discus (180cm - 72
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Lumen: 8000
  • LEDs: 176x 0.50 watt
  • Config: 144x 6500K, 32x Actinic
  • 2 Modes: All on / 32x only
  • Timer Ready

MingDak LED Aquarium Hood Light - Fish Tank Light, Full Spectrum LED Aquarium Light with Extendable Brackets,Combination Lighting Color White & Blue & Green & Red & Purple,6500K,30 Inches

MingDak LED Aquarium Hood Light - Fish Tank Light, Full Spectrum LED Aquarium Light with Extendable Brackets,Combination Lighting Color White & Blue & Green & Red & Purple,6500K,30 Inches
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • MORE SPECIALIZED LIGHT SOURCES: Mingdak 6500 Kevin full-spectrum LED aquarium light which have the spectral range of lighting from 400 to 700 nanometers that is needed by plants & symbiotic zooanthellic algae have produced the best freshwater plant growth.Your java moss, marimos, banana plants will thrive under the powerful Led lights.
  • BRINGING FISH COLOR OUT:Mingdak LED aquarium light gives off vital energy, influences fish behavior,brings out the Best Color of your Fish.This Mingdak LED Aquarium light is 25% brighter than other standard light.Bright light not only helps enrich the color of the fish,but also helps darken the pigments of many fish, making them stand out.
  • MAKING AQUARIUM VIEWING PLEASURE:Mingdak LED Aquarium Lights provide the ultimate opportunity to create a realistic underwater home-aquarium environment.Two lighting modes, the full-spectrum dayling will produce a beautiful halo effect on the water and your fish and plant will come to life under these lights,and blue moon light help to observe nocturnal behavior.
  • ENERGY-SAVING AND LOW RADIATION:Mingdak LED aquarium light fixtures are extremely energy-efficient,low power consumption and 50,000 hour bulb life.This light takes very little energy to produce and has a low heat output.They will not affect the temperature of your tank water in any way.
  • EASILY MOUNTS TO YOUR AQUARIUM:Aluminum housing and adjustable mounting legs fit both rimless and framed aquarium tank from 30 inches to 38 inches

Tetra LED Cube Shaped 3 Gallon Aquarium with Pedestal Base

Tetra LED Cube Shaped 3 Gallon Aquarium with Pedestal Base
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Equipped with a Tetra 3i filter to keep your tank clean and provide a perfect environment for small tropical fish.
  • The tank features an LED light to show off your fish
  • Lid features a convenient feeding hole. Material : Glass and acrylic
  • Perfect for small tropical fish, goldfish or betta.
  • 10" D x 10"W x 10.512"H
  • Equipped with a Tetra 3i filter to keep your tank clean and provide a perfect environment for small tropical fish
  • The tank features an LED light to highlight your fish
  • The lid features a convenient feeding hole
  • For small tropical fish, goldfish, or a betta
  • 10" D x 10"W x 10.512"H

Scuba Behind the Glass: Aquarium Diving

Three great dives behind the glass at three of the best aquariums in the United States.

If the conversation occurs in my home state of Rhode Island, it would include sentences like "Wow, the visibility was, like, five inches." Or on a good night it would include, "Did you see that gigantic lobster? I tried to catch it, but it got away." It is an unspoken rule among divers that dishing about the dive must last at least twice as long as the actual event.

There are three dives in particular that I've now talked about for an unknown length of time. The first occurred in June 2020. Todd (my husband and also my favorite dive buddy) and I were bumming around in Orlando for a long weekend. We had heard an unsubstantiated rumor that The Living Seas aquarium at Epcot Center was open to scuba divers. We bee-lined to the park to confirm the rumor. Before we knew it we managed to sneak into the last two spots available for the last dive of the day.

In the pre-dive briefing we were told that there were two 8-foot sharks in the 5.7 million gallon aquarium, and one of those sharks was re-introduced to the environment just two weeks before. The guide went on to say that the recently reunited shark was removed from the tank because he displayed aggressive tendencies. The words "aggressive" and "shark" reverberated in my brain as the briefing continued. We were told that the sharks tend to swim in a clearly defined pattern, and that we would be wise to stay out of their way. Todd held up his hands and said, "No problem!" while the other divers nervously laughed and nodded in agreement.

Seemingly moments later we hit the water. We were led through the tank by a pair of dive masters, and shown around the features of the tank. Then we were set loose to explore on our own. Todd and I stayed together and swam through the exhibit an arm's length away from each other, as we always do when we dive together. We ducked below the rock features, and played with the angelfish hiding in its shadows. We watched the eagle rays hover on the bottom and the sharks circulate through the tank. Then I looked up and noticed that the aquarium visitors were watching me through the glass.

I spotted a small boy that turned his attention away from the tank; I swam to the glass just below where the boy stood. I slowly scaled the glass until I was face to face with him and waited until he turned toward the tank again. He jumped back, obviously startled about being nose to nose with a human in the aquarium. The boy's mother doubled over with laughter and hugged the boy to help him recover from the fright. We waved and I pressed my hand against the glass. The boy placed his hand against my hand as if to say, "I forgive you even though you scared the daylights out of me."

We continued exploring the tank, and avoided the sharks as they swam in their rotation around the tank. Eventually the clicking sound of the dive master knocking rocks together echoed through the tank. We returned to the center of the tank and ascended. I turned circles just to take in a few more glimpses of the tank before my head poked through the surface.

***

A year and a half later, in December 2020, Todd and I stepped off the plane in Atlanta, Georgia. In six days it would be his birthday, and I presented him with tickets to dive the Ocean Voyager tank at the Georgia Aquarium. The prime attraction in the 6.3 million gallon tank is four whale sharks; the largest one measures 26 feet long.

The aquarium is designed so that visitors will feel like they are inside the tank. The tank can be viewed through acrylic bubbles that protrude into the tank, and from a giant tube that intersects the center of the tank as well. From this vantage point, guests can view giant sting rays flapping their wings and exposing their undersides without having to don scuba gear. Hammerhead sharks, guitarfish, and enormous groupers all share the tank with the four whale sharks.

The main difference between the Living Seas dive at Epcot and the "Journey with Gentle Giants" dive in the Georgia Aquarium is that we were permitted nearly unrestricted access to the tank at Epcot, so long as we didn't touch the animals. In the Georgia Aquarium tank we were not allowed to stray from the group. We stayed in a close formation, a string of four buddy pairs swimming one after the other and were strictly forbidden from touching the animals.

We reached the center of the tank and knelt on the bottom and looked toward the surface. Thousands of colorful reef fish circled above, a dense population only seen on a computer screen saver. We held still as dozens of fish circled in to investigate the beings on the bottom blowing long streams of bubbles that led to the surface. From the distance the whale sharks emerged. Their spotted markings came into focus as they approached, as they swam their patterns right by us.

The dive master guided us through the tank as my eyes scanned the habitat to absorb as much of it as I could. I turned to face Todd, on my left, just as a hammerhead shark passed just in front of his face, its tail fin just shy of grazing the glass of his mask. He turned to face me and I opened my eyes wide at him and clapped my hands, which is the underwater signal we use to express delight.

We continued on our guided tour of the tank when a whale shark approached Todd's left side. It passed close enough so that he could have reached out his left arm and touched it as it passed. I could see the debate cross over his face as the shark passed-he knew he would likely never get the chance to touch a whale shark again, but also knew we would be immediately expelled from the tank if he disregarded the rule of the aquarium and touched the wildlife. He kept his hands at his sides and watched in awe as the shark passed and swam away.

All too soon we were given the signal to surface, and we ascended the same way as we had at Epcot-turning circles to take in the last few glimpses of the whale sharks and the thousands of other species in the tank.

***

A chilly breeze blew through Boston on Valentines Day 2020 as I simultaneously hauled two sets of dive gear through the streets toward the New England Aquarium while Todd parked our truck. I was greeted by Anna at the member services desk and led upstairs to the "backstage area" of the aquarium where I stashed our gear and met the director of the aquarium.

Todd and I were the only guest divers in the Giant Ocean Tank, which is a four story structure in the center of the building. The tank is 23 feet deep and holds 200,000 gallons of water. In the center of the tank there is a man-made reef with hundreds of nooks in which the fish can dart in and out. Visitors to the aquarium view the inhabitants of the tank by walking up a ramp that spirals around the perimeter of the cylindrical tank. The tank is open at the top, and visitors are able to stand at the edges and peer down into the tank while an aquarium staffer gives scheduled talks on the different animals that call the tank home. There are several sand tiger sharks in the tank, as well as sea turtles. One of the turtles, Myrtle, is at least 70 years old and has lived in the tank since 1970. She weighs more than 500 pounds and is the premier attraction at the New England Aquarium. The tank also houses stingrays, barracudas, moray eels, and hundreds of reef fish.

Todd and I stood on the platform at the top of the tank with our guide while dozens of guests looked on. We did a giant stride into the water and quickly descended to the bottom. The water was approximately 70 degrees, which was warm enough for me to dive without my gloves. We were permitted to interact with the animals, so long as we respected them. We were only allowed to touch them as they swam in their patterns, and were not allowed to chase them or trap them to force an interaction. Anna showed the inside of the reef and pointed an invitation to go inside. I entered the bottom of the reef and saw that the interior was hollow. I swam up the column and escaped at the top, near a moray eel that stuck its head out to check me out. I swam back to the bottom where Myrtle was dozing as Todd stroked her neck. I caressed her fins, and then massaged her neck; she gently bowed her head then slowly swam to the surface.

The sand tiger sharks swam in circles around the reef. I held out my hand and felt their sandpapery skin down the length of their bodies as they swam by. Then I felt a slight pinch on my arm. Mildly alarmed, I cautiously looked down to see a small damsel fish nibbling on my arm. I could barely feel it through my 7mm wetsuit. I laughed and shook it off my arm; for the rest of the dive a few brave damsels nibbled at my arms and legs.

We swam around the reef at varying depths, and poked in and out of the artificial coral. A bright green moray gracefully twirled in front of us then eased itself under another outcropping of coral. Myrtle and her sea turtle friends swam to us and smiled as we pet their fins and rubbed their shells. I pretended to shake Myrtle's hand, while children watching through the glass pointed and laughed with delight.

Anna signaled by pointing at her wrist then sticking her thumb up which is diver-ese "Time to surface." Todd flashed his "I am so bummed this dive is over" expression as I nodded to express that I agreed.

Each of these experiences in these aquariums was uniquely beautiful, and I highly recommend each one of them. Though it was the smallest habitat we had the pleasure of diving in, the New England Aquarium provided the most interactive encounter. The Georgia Aquarium provided the most unique dive because it offered the chance to explore a whale shark habitat. The Living Seas at Epcot offers Disney guests the chance to view the exhibit from the inside, and is off the beaten path of the Orlando amusement parks.

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