10 Best Reef Aquarium Test Kits

Updated on: June 2021

Best Reef Aquarium Test Kits in 2021


API REEF MASTER TEST KIT Reef Aquarium Water Test Kit 1-Count

API REEF MASTER TEST KIT Reef Aquarium Water Test Kit 1-Count
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Qguai 9 in 1 Aquarium Test Strips, Water Test Strips for Saltwater Freshwater Pond Pool Spa, Test pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, Carbonate, Chlorine, Alkalinity, Hardness, Fast and Accurate,50-Strips

Qguai 9 in 1 Aquarium Test Strips, Water Test Strips for Saltwater Freshwater Pond Pool Spa, Test pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, Carbonate, Chlorine, Alkalinity, Hardness, Fast and Accurate,50-Strips
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • 9 in 1 Aquarium Test strips -pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, Carbonate, Chlorine, Alkalinity, Iron, Copper,Hardness in salt water fresh water pond reef aquarium, 50 count in 1 bottle.
  • Extremely easy to use test strips - Simply dip this freshwater saltwater test strips into water and compare it to the chart on bottle.convenient and get results in seconds.
  • Wide application -it can be used to test the levels of all sorts of products such as pond pool saltwater freshwater aquarium.
  • Validity period: Placed it dry at 2 C ~ 30 C to protect from light, and the validity period is 24 months. Pls notice the date on the bottle and the label is the production date, Lot: 2019082006 means it is produced on 08/20/2019, batch 6, so the expiratios date is 2 years after this day.
  • Any problem, just contact us and we will do our best to help.

Salifert Master Reef Testing Combo Kit - Saltwater Aquariums

Salifert Master Reef Testing Combo Kit - Saltwater Aquariums
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Six Salifert Professional Test Kits
  • Includes Calcium, Nitrate, Phosphate, pH, Alkalinity & Magnesium
  • Includes all the Core parameters of any Saltwater Aquarium/Marine Reef Tank

Salifert pH Test Kit

Salifert pH Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • The pH test kit provides accurate pH fluctuations
  • The pH test kit can perform up to 50 tests
  • The pH test monitors the pH and provides an effective alkalinity

Tetra EasyStrips 6-In-1 aquarium Test Strips, Water Testing, Model:19543

Tetra EasyStrips 6-In-1 aquarium Test Strips, Water Testing, Model:19543
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • COMPLETE TESTING Regularly testing your water levels is critical to the success of your aquarium
  • 6 DIFFERENT TESTS WITH 1 STRIP Just one test monitors nitrates nitrites water hardness chlorine alkalinity and pH levels
  • VERSATILE Can be used in both freshwater and saltwater aquariums
  • CONVENIENT Just dip into water wait 60 seconds and read results
  • USAGE Use weekly to monitor aquarium water after water changes or when adding new fish
  • Age Range Description: All Life Stages

API CARBONATE HARDNESS TEST KIT Aquarium Water Test Kit

API CARBONATE HARDNESS TEST KIT Aquarium Water Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API CARBONATE HARDNESS TEST KIT Aquarium Water Test Kit, including 1 bottle of testing solution, 1 color card and 1 glass test tube with cap
  • Helps monitor water quality and prevent invisible water problems that can be harmful to fish and plants and cause fish loss
  • Accurately measures carbonate hardness in freshwater and saltwater aquariums
  • KH (Carbonate Hardness) stabilizes aquarium pH.
  • Use weekly for monitoring and when water or fish problems appear

API HIGH RANGE PH TEST KIT 160-Test Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water Test Kit

API HIGH RANGE PH TEST KIT 160-Test Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API HIGH RANGE PH TEST KIT 160-Test Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water Test Kit, including 1 bottle of testing solution, 1 color card and 1 glass test tube with cap
  • Helps monitor pH and prevent invisible water problems that can be harmful to fish and cause fish loss
  • Accurately reads pH range 7.4 - 8.8, ideal for Goldfish, Marine, and African Cichlids.
  • Because different geographies have different tap water conditions, and different fish need different pH levels to be healthy, API helps measure pH levels & detect pH fluctuation caused by fish waste, uneaten food and addition of tap water.
  • Use for weekly monitoring and when water or fish problems appear

Red Sea Reef Foundation Test Kit - Calcium, Alkalinity & Magnesium

Red Sea Reef Foundation Test Kit - Calcium, Alkalinity & Magnesium
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Saltwater Reef Foundation Pro Multi Test Kit
  • Includes High Accuracy Titration Tests For The Accurate Measurement Of The Elements Calcium, Magnesium And Alkalinity (KHz)
  • All of these elements need to be available in balanced proportions for sustainable successful coral health and growth
  • This Test Kit Enables Accurate Dosing Of The Reef Foundation Supplements
  • Test Kit Includes 5Ppm 75-Test Calcium Pro, 0. 05 Me/L 75-Test KHz/Alkalinity Pro And 20 Ppm 60-Test Magnesium Pro Tests

Salifert Alkalinity Calcium Magnesium Combo Test Kit

Salifert Alkalinity Calcium Magnesium Combo Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

API 5-in-1 Test Strips Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Test Strips 25-Count Box

API 5-in-1 Test Strips Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Test Strips 25-Count Box
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API 5-IN-1 TEST STRIPS Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Test Strips 25-Count Box
  • Monitors levels of pH, nitrite, nitrate carbonate and general water hardness in freshwater and saltwater aquariums
  • Dip test strips into aquarium water and check colors for fast and accurate results
  • Helps prevent invisible water problems that can be harmful to fish and cause fish loss
  • Use for weekly monitoring and when water or fish problems appear

New Closet Aquaponic System - Week 2

Second week update for an indoor aquaponics unit, using aquarium testing equipment in aquaponics, evaluation of actual electrical and hardware costs. Dealing with hard, high pH water in aquaponics.

My new system is performing correctly, and based on discussions last week I decided to accelerate my efforts towards a financial return by planting three types of basil and yellow tomatoes. After speaking with a couple of chefs that I've worked with, I realized I have a market directly available, and failure to optimize it would be a failure to follow the business plan I laid out in another paper here on . They are interested in both micro and full grown basil varieties, and I've got cinnamon, thai, and purple (all ocimum basilicum). I've also got seedling yellow jubilee tomatoes (an indeterminate heirloom), which will be moved to a second, deeper growbed. I'm finishing the paper with information about my pH and hard water problems and solutions.

I added five small tropical fish (cherry barbs, 5 for $7) to improve the cycle the of the aquarium prior to the arrival of my stock next week. I'm sticking with the 1 fish per 5 gallon guideline, with 11 fish going into my 55 gallon tank. Should they be large enough and inclined to mate, I've got a second tank I can use to house the fry. I choose the larger gravel in this tans specifically to the purpose of offering a breeding ground.

The first few weeks of a new aquarium require the most attention. The limits of the available tests included with the rather standard set that I'm using seems to be largely limited to not knowing what level the nitrites are actually at, this is because the normal curve of a nitrogen cycle goes so far beyond the scope of a test that tops out at 5.0 parts per million (ppm). Mines been higher than that since the 3rd day after I set up the system. The expectation is that it will peak and then decline, as the bacteria cycle establishes itself. Nitrites are toxic to fish, and although I don't expect the five small fish that I'm cycling the tank with to all survive the experience, I'd rather not lose any if I can help it. My nitrate levels (a key chemical that the plants utilize), had risen steadily until the seedlings came up out of the clay balls I'm using as growing media (hydoton). My ammonia levels spiked initially, then fell of to a consistent 0.25 ppm for the last 10 days. This is exactly what is normally predicted with the developing cycle. I purposely ran this cycle with tap water, even though I've got aquarium water available, in order to show how to start it and test the results. As of day 15 I'm adding 4 gallons of water from my established aquarium, which should quickly bring things into balance. I added the water through the growbed, in an effort to keep the solid waste available for the plants.

The problems that I facing with heat and humidity are particular to the fact that I'm using an upstairs closet, not altered as of yet in any way. To control moisture, I made a tight fitting lid for the tank, although I choose the wrong material. I thought I could get away with plywood, and didn't apply enough polyurethane prior to using it. That was an error I shall not repeat, and the 20th coat is drying tonight. In the interim, I've had to add almost a gallon a day to compensate for the moisture loss. The vent from the hood is directed towards the tank, balancing the temperatures, but aiding in evaporation at the moment. The lid will fix that problem, as evaporation in the short time it was in place was very limited. I am considering adding a ceiling vent, and will do so if I can at any point feel moisture on the walls. This hasn't happened apart from spills. The waster I lost has been replenished, and the refinished lid in in place.

4 days ago I added a piece of driftwood to the aquarium, with the intentions of using the tannins to lower the pH. I'm uncertain of it's size or composition, only that it was marked as Malaysian. When I added the driftwood I removed the peat, and I opted for a chemical solution to my pH and hard water problems. My tap water comes out at 8.2 pH, and it's very hard. I was trying an organic solution, but as long as I know it's safe for the fish (and it's an aquarium product), I'm comfortable using a limited number of chemicals. Off the shelf pH lowering products didn't work for me. I've opted to try a bisulphate that supposed to eventually break down the hard water buffer that's holding the pH so high. The blue Nile Tilapia that I'm going to stock the tank with on Wednesday prefer a pH of neutral (7.0), and I'd like to get closer by then. For the last three days I've adjust the pH, only to have it return upward, a 7.4-7.8 pH is the range I'm seeing at this point, depending on how long it's been since a chemical adjustment. After week 5 I'll post a graph of the reading I got through out the development of the nitrogen cycle, comparing levels in the type of similar work, thus far my results are in line.

Teaching a person to fish is not longer enough to feed them for a lifetime. Even with accesses to open water, our oceans, rivers, and lakes are not able to continue to support our needs. Teach a person to grow fish, and vegetables, and you get a lot closer to helping humanity's long term survival prospects. By sharing mine I hope you help you build yours.

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