10 Best Way To Get Algae Off Fish Tank

Updated on: September 2021

Best Way To Get Algae Off Fish Tank in 2021


rOXIN 7W Aquarium Water Green Clean Lamp Algae Bloom Clear Waterproof Light for Fish Tank Pond Pump Sump

rOXIN 7W Aquarium Water Green Clean Lamp Algae Bloom Clear Waterproof Light for Fish Tank Pond Pump Sump
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Luffy Nano Betta Balls, 0.4 Inch, Aquarium Play Toy for Betta Fish, Creates Aesthetically Appealing Backdrop, Round-Shaped Marimo Balls, Supports 5-10 Gallon Tanks, Low-Maintenance, 6 Pack

Luffy Nano Betta Balls, 0.4 Inch, Aquarium Play Toy for Betta Fish, Creates Aesthetically Appealing Backdrop, Round-Shaped Marimo Balls, Supports 5-10 Gallon Tanks, Low-Maintenance, 6 Pack
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • SMALL AND PRETTY ADDITION TO YOUR BETTA TANK --- These LUFFY Betta Balls are beautiful marimos that are a great addition for your betta’s tank. They are nano-sized, between 0.4 and 0.6 inches, and add color to your tank.
  • BETTA TANK CLEANER --- LUFFY Betta Balls will help to keep your fish tank clean. Marimo moss balls absorb debris and fish excreta that tend to contaminate your betta’s surroundings.
  • ENTERTAINMENT TOY FOR YOUR BETTA --- Bettas love to move stuff around and nano LUFFY Betta Balls make the perfect toys for your watery pet. Therefore, not only do they help to keep your betta’s environment clean, but they also provide them with entertainment.
  • IDEAL TEMPERATURE FOR THRIVING --- Avoid temperature of 84°F (29°C) or higher. Marimo is a slow-growing plant, however, its growth rate will be expedited at a temperature of between 68°F - 77°F (20°C - 25°C). Note: When Marimo grows, simply roll the marimo on your palm gently in a circular direction. - Place marimo under indoor lighting/ natural lighting. Keep it away from heat. Avoid direct sunlight.
  • EASY MAINTENANCE --- LUFFY Betta Balls require practically no maintenance. All they need are some light, freshwater, and something to feed off of. Basically, everything you already have in your betta’s tank. The only other additional maintenance is that when you change your betta’s water, you have to give the Betta Balls a squeeze over a sink or bucket to help remove any built-up accumulated over time. When done, simply toss it back in the tank. This will retain the round shape of the balls.

Jasonwell Magnetic Aquarium Fish Tank Glass Algae Glass Cleaner Scrubber Floating Clean Brush(S)

Jasonwell Magnetic Aquarium Fish Tank Glass Algae Glass Cleaner Scrubber Floating Clean Brush(S)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Clean algae and scum off of the inside of your aquarium the easy, fun way!
  • Strong magnetic forces cause the inside cleaning brush to follow the outside handle. Just wipe the outside, and the inside is cleaned!
  • The inside piece floats, so if it becomes separated from the outside piece, it's easy to retrieve.
  • Simply drag the no-scratch, felt-lined handle and inside your aquarium, the scrubber follows, cleaning as it goes
  • IMPORTANT: Made for common glass fish tank. Not for acrylic and low iron glass. Please choose the size by the thickness of your fish tank glass.THE LARGER,TEH STRONGER TEH MAGNET. This product comes with a 2-year warranty and 100% money-back guarantee.

SunGrow Blade Refills for Aquarium Glass Scrubber, 1.7x0.8 Inches, Stainless Steel Razor-Sharp Blade, Removes Even The Most Stubborn Residue, 3-Minutes to Get Crystal Clear Glass, Set of 10

SunGrow Blade Refills for Aquarium Glass Scrubber, 1.7x0.8 Inches, Stainless Steel Razor-Sharp Blade, Removes Even The Most Stubborn Residue, 3-Minutes to Get Crystal Clear Glass, Set of 10
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • ✔ RAZOR SHARP STAINLESS STEEL BLADE --- SunGrow brings you 10 razor sharp stainless steel blade so that your residue cleaner never have to run out of blades. If you find that the razor blade is not doing its job as well as before, you can remove and replace the blade with a brand new, sharp blade to scrape off any slimy gook from your tank.
  • ✔ USE THIS BLADE REFILL PACK WITH SUNGROW SCRAPER --- The cost-effective value for money pack of 10 blades had to be made use with the SunGrow’s Aquarium Scrapers. This helps in cleaning the glass surface from hard water stains.
  • ✔ SUITABLE FOR GLASS AQUARIUMS ONLY --- The scraper’s razor is sharp, yet it will not damage your glass aquarium in any way. You can simply scrape off all the unwanted scum, leaving the glass pristine and scratch-free.
  • ✔ REMOVES EVEN THE MOST STUBBORN RESIDUE--- The unique design of this fish tank razor cleaner will cut through and remove even the thickest residue. Even if you have been neglecting to clean the residue, this metal scraper will give your tank a fast makeover, leaving it clean and clear.
  • ✔ STAINLESS STEEL DESIGN --- In this pack you will receive 10 razor blades for your cleaner. They are made from stainless steel which is completely resistant to any rust or corrosion. Use your metal scraper for years to come.

Aqueon 100533613 Planted Aquarium Clip-On LED Light,Black,8" x 7" x 4.75"

Aqueon 100533613 Planted Aquarium Clip-On LED Light,Black,8
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Clip-on Aquarium LED light; ideal for growing plants
  • 60 bright LEDs help support and grow lush plants
  • 3-Way soft-touch LED control (all on/Blue on/all off)
  • Ideal for planted aquariums up to 20 gallons
  • Easily mounts on framed or frameless aquariums with mounting screw

MingDak LED Aquarium Hood Light - Fish Tank Light, Full Spectrum LED Aquarium Light with Extendable Brackets,Combination Lighting Color White & Blue & Green & Red & Purple,6500K,18 Inches

MingDak LED Aquarium Hood Light - Fish Tank Light, Full Spectrum LED Aquarium Light with Extendable Brackets,Combination Lighting Color White & Blue & Green & Red & Purple,6500K,18 Inches
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • MORE SPECIALIZED LIGHT SOURCES: Mingdak 6500 Kevin full-spectrum LED aquarium light which have the spectral range of lighting from 400 to 700 nanometers that is needed by plants & symbiotic zooanthellic algae have produced the best freshwater plant growth.Your java moss, marimos, banana plants will thrive under the powerful Led lights.
  • BRINGING FISH COLOR OUT:Mingdak LED aquarium light gives off vital energy, influences fish behavior,brings out the Best Color of your Fish.This Mingdak LED Aquarium light is 25% brighter than other standard light.Bright light not only helps enrich the color of the fish,but also helps darken the pigments of many fish, making them stand out.
  • MAKING AQUARIUM VIEWING PLEASURE:Mingdak LED Aquarium Lights provide the ultimate opportunity to create a realistic underwater home-aquarium environment.Two lighting modes, the full-spectrum dayling will produce a beautiful halo effect on the water and your fish and plant will come to life under these lights,and blue moon light help to observe nocturnal behavior.
  • ENERGY-SAVING AND LOW RADIATION:Mingdak LED aquarium light fixtures are extremely energy-efficient,low power consumption and 50,000 hour bulb life.This light takes very little energy to produce and has a low heat output.They will not affect the temperature of your tank water in any way.
  • EASILY MOUNTS TO YOUR AQUARIUM:Aluminum housing and adjustable mounting legs fit both rimless and framed aquarium tank from 18 inches to 26 inches.

Tetra Hidden LED Stick 6 Inches, Brilliant White Aquarium Light for Tanks Up to 15 Gallons

Tetra Hidden LED Stick 6 Inches, Brilliant White Aquarium Light for Tanks Up to 15 Gallons
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • HIDDEN LED LIGHT STICK Compact waterproof LED fixture illuminates aquariums with brilliant white light creating a natural underwater shimmer effect
  • EASY TO INSTALL Clips onto any framed aquarium – on the frame or under the hood
  • COMPACT FIXTURE Easy to hide from view use the included routing clips to conceal the cord
  • INCLUDES Aquarium light low-voltage transformer on/off switch frame clip and cord routing clips
  • SIZE This 6-inch long LED stick illuminates aquariums up to 15 gallons

Midwest Rake Company 87028 Aquatic Weed Eradicator, blue

Midwest Rake Company 87028 Aquatic Weed Eradicator, blue
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Aquatic weed eradicator rake
  • 28" width reinforced serrated cutting blades
  • 11' 2-piece powder-coated aluminum handle
  • Sturdy blade cuts underwater weeds off on the bottom
  • Great gift idea for lake dwellers

API 3 Pack Root Tabs Freshwater Aquarium Plant Fertilizer, 10 Tablets Per Box

API 3 Pack Root Tabs Freshwater Aquarium Plant Fertilizer, 10 Tablets Per Box
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Contains Three API root tabs freshwater aquarium Plant fertilizer 0.4-Ounce 10-Count box
  • Promotes strong root development for lush plants in freshwater aquariums
  • Contains essential nutrients including iron, Potassium and carbon
  • Helps new aquatic plants get off to a vigorous start and to keep established plants flourishing
  • Pack of 3

YKing1 Angelfish in Tropical Aquarium Angelfish Stock Pictures, Royalty Wall Art Painting Pictures Print On Canvas Stretched & Framed Artworks Modern Hanging Posters Home Decor 4PANEL

YKing1 Angelfish in Tropical Aquarium Angelfish Stock Pictures, Royalty Wall Art Painting Pictures Print On Canvas Stretched & Framed Artworks Modern Hanging Posters Home Decor 4PANEL
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • WALL ART SIZE: Measures in 12''x24''x2pcs+12''x32''x2pcs, total 4 pieces framed.
  • READY TO HANG: The gallery canvas print is already perfectly wrapped and stretched with wooden frame on the back. Comes with hooks for easy hanging.
  • WHAT YOU GET IS WHAT YOU SEE: High Definition modern canvas printing artwork, photo printed on high quality canvas with vivid colors. A perfect contemporary art paintings for bedroom, living room, kitchen, office, hotel, guest room, dining room, bathroom, bar, etc.
  • PERFECT GIFT: It is a unique home interior wall decoration to decorate your space. A Perfect Christmas, New Year, Wedding, Anniversary, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Valentine, Birthday Gifts for your relatives and friends.
  • BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE: We promise we will give you the best service and solution whatever happened. Please do not hesitate to contact us if any questions. Click adds to cart now and grab the best deal on Amazon!

Tapping on the World's Tank? - Underwater Noise Pollution

Remember when the clerk in the pet store told you not to tap on the fish tank, because the sound disturbs the fish? Turns out it's true. Underwater noise can adversely affect marine life.

Remember when the clerk in the pet store told you not to tap on the fish tank, because the percussive sound disturbs the fish? Turns out it's true, underwater noise can adversely effect marine life, particularly the mid-frequency, high intensity sonar systems used by U.S. Navy ships and submarines to detect enemy stealth submarine technology.

Last year the Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of three other environmental and animal rights groups, won a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy, in which the Navy agreed to scale back the use of low-frequency wave technology. However, they continued the use of the mid-frequency high intensity sonar, which interferes with a marine mammal's ability to navigate, find food, communicate and avoid predators.

"Without reasonable limits, the proliferation of high intensity sonar will cause excruciating pain, injury and death for an increasing number of marine animals," said Frederick O'Regan, president of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In the last nine years there have been 10 cases of mass strandings and whale deaths associated with mid-frequency sonar testing in the coastal waters from Greece to the Canary Islands.

Researchers from the Zoological Society of London and the University of Las Palmas in the Canary Islands have found nitrogen bubbles in the tissues of stranded whales which exhibited the same effects as those of decompression sickness (DCS) in humans.

"The detailed examination of the mass stranded whales in the Canaries in 2002 suggests the naval sonar could induce a condition similar to DCS," Professor Antonio Fernandez of the University of Las Palmas said.

In early July 2004, a pod of 200 deep-water melon-headed whales stampeded into the shallow waters off Kauai, Hawaii, during U.S.-Japanese naval training exercises utilizing the high intensity sonar. In the confusion, one of the whales was stranded and died.

Post mortem examinations on some whales exposed to sonar show evidence of internal ear hemorrhaging similar to that found in divers who have suffered from the "bends" or decompression sickness, according to the science journal, Nature.

"There's a growing body of evidence that indicates intense active sonar harms marine mammals, causing them to strand, causing physical injury and disruptions," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The coalition is willing to go to court to block the Navy's continued use of the sonar, however, the National Marine Fisheries Department recently granted the Navy permission to operate its new low frequency sonar system, exempting them from the Marine Mammal Protection Act for the next five years.

The Navy offered these provisions to mitigate the effects of the sonar; to keep the sonar testing at least 12 miles away from the coast and to shut down the sonar if marine mammals are detected within 2 km of the testing area.

However, even with the provisions in place the whale deaths continue.

A mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas in 2000 has been linked to sonar testing in the area. Then, the last week in July, two dead whales washed ashore on Spain's Canary Islands, a few days after NATO exercises involving 20,000 troops and more than 20 warships occurred in the area.

"There is a strong suspicion that that their deaths were related to the NATO exercises that finished a few days ago" said Tony Gallardo, environmental expert with the government of the island of Fuerteventura, located off the southern Moroccan coast.

Even the whale watching expeditions that have become so popular have begun to harm marine mammals. Studies have shown that the noise from the boats disrupts the whale's hunting patterns, makes it harder to find food, and forces them to swim faster to get away from the boats. This causes the whales to burn off blubber, which is laden with toxins, and they end up dying from the chemicals, according to Mark Anderson, president of Orca Relief Citizen's Alliance.

Last year the Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of three other environmental and animal rights groups, won a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy, in which the Navy agreed to scale back the use of low-frequency wave technology. However, they continued the use of the mid-frequency high intensity sonar, which interferes with a marine mammal's ability to navigate, find food, communicate and avoid predators.

"Without reasonable limits, the proliferation of high intensity sonar will cause excruciating pain, injury and death for an increasing number of marine animals," said Frederick O'Regan, president of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In the last nine years there have been 10 cases of mass strandings and whale deaths associated with mid-frequency sonar testing in the coastal waters from Greece to the Canary Islands.

Researchers from the Zoological Society of London and the University of Las Palmas in the Canary Islands have found nitrogen bubbles in the tissues of stranded whales which exhibited the same effects as those of decompression sickness (DCS) in humans.

"The detailed examination of the mass stranded whales in the Canaries in 2002 suggests the naval sonar could induce a condition similar to DCS," Professor Antonio Fernandez of the University of Las Palmas said.

In early July 2004, a pod of 200 deep-water melon-headed whales stampeded into the shallow waters off Kauai, Hawaii, during U.S.-Japanese naval training exercises utilizing the high intensity sonar. In the confusion, one of the whales was stranded and died.

Post mortem examinations on some whales exposed to sonar show evidence of internal ear hemorrhaging similar to that found in divers who have suffered from the "bends" or decompression sickness, according to the science journal, Nature.

"There's a growing body of evidence that indicates intense active sonar harms marine mammals, causing them to strand, causing physical injury and disruptions," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The coalition is willing to go to court to block the Navy's continued use of the sonar, however, the National Marine Fisheries Department recently granted the Navy permission to operate its new low frequency sonar system, exempting them from the Marine Mammal Protection Act for the next five years.

The Navy offered these provisions to mitigate the effects of the sonar; to keep the sonar testing at least 12 miles away from the coast and to shut down the sonar if marine mammals are detected within 2 km of the testing area.

However, even with the provisions in place the whale deaths continue.

A mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas in 2000 has been linked to sonar testing in the area. Then, the last week in July, two dead whales washed ashore on Spain's Canary Islands, a few days after NATO exercises involving 20,000 troops and more than 20 warships occurred in the area.

"There is a strong suspicion that that their deaths were related to the NATO exercises that finished a few days ago" said Tony Gallardo, environmental expert with the government of the island of Fuerteventura, located off the southern Moroccan coast.

Even the whale watching expeditions that have become so popular have begun to harm marine mammals. Studies have shown that the noise from the boats disrupts the whale's hunting patterns, makes it harder to find food, and forces them to swim faster to get away from the boats. This causes the whales to burn off blubber, which is laden with toxins, and they end up dying from the chemicals, according to Mark Anderson, president of Orca Relief Citizen's Alliance.

Last year the Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of three other environmental and animal rights groups, won a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy, in which the Navy agreed to scale back the use of low-frequency wave technology. However, they continued the use of the mid-frequency high intensity sonar, which interferes with a marine mammal's ability to navigate, find food, communicate and avoid predators.

"Without reasonable limits, the proliferation of high intensity sonar will cause excruciating pain, injury and death for an increasing number of marine animals," said Frederick O'Regan, president of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In the last nine years there have been 10 cases of mass strandings and whale deaths associated with mid-frequency sonar testing in the coastal waters from Greece to the Canary Islands.

Researchers from the Zoological Society of London and the University of Las Palmas in the Canary Islands have found nitrogen bubbles in the tissues of stranded whales which exhibited the same effects as those of decompression sickness (DCS) in humans.

"The detailed examination of the mass stranded whales in the Canaries in 2002 suggests the naval sonar could induce a condition similar to DCS," Professor Antonio Fernandez of the University of Las Palmas said.

In early July 2004, a pod of 200 deep-water melon-headed whales stampeded into the shallow waters off Kauai, Hawaii, during U.S.-Japanese naval training exercises utilizing the high intensity sonar. In the confusion, one of the whales was stranded and died.

Post mortem examinations on some whales exposed to sonar show evidence of internal ear hemorrhaging similar to that found in divers who have suffered from the "bends" or decompression sickness, according to the science journal, Nature.

"There's a growing body of evidence that indicates intense active sonar harms marine mammals, causing them to strand, causing physical injury and disruptions," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The coalition is willing to go to court to block the Navy's continued use of the sonar, however, the National Marine Fisheries Department recently granted the Navy permission to operate its new low frequency sonar system, exempting them from the Marine Mammal Protection Act for the next five years.

The Navy offered these provisions to mitigate the effects of the sonar; to keep the sonar testing at least 12 miles away from the coast and to shut down the sonar if marine mammals are detected within 2 km of the testing area.

However, even with the provisions in place the whale deaths continue.

A mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas in 2000 has been linked to sonar testing in the area. Then, the last week in July, two dead whales washed ashore on Spain's Canary Islands, a few days after NATO exercises involving 20,000 troops and more than 20 warships occurred in the area.

"There is a strong suspicion that that their deaths were related to the NATO exercises that finished a few days ago" said Tony Gallardo, environmental expert with the government of the island of Fuerteventura, located off the southern Moroccan coast.

Even the whale watching expeditions that have become so popular have begun to harm marine mammals. Studies have shown that the noise from the boats disrupts the whale's hunting patterns, makes it harder to find food, and forces them to swim faster to get away from the boats. This causes the whales to burn off blubber, which is laden with toxins, and they end up dying from the chemicals, according to Mark Anderson, president of Orca Relief Citizen's Alliance.

Last year the Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of three other environmental and animal rights groups, won a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy, in which the Navy agreed to scale back the use of low-frequency wave technology. However, they continued the use of the mid-frequency high intensity sonar, which interferes with a marine mammal's ability to navigate, find food, communicate and avoid predators.

"Without reasonable limits, the proliferation of high intensity sonar will cause excruciating pain, injury and death for an increasing number of marine animals," said Frederick O'Regan, president of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In the last nine years there have been 10 cases of mass strandings and whale deaths associated with mid-frequency sonar testing in the coastal waters from Greece to the Canary Islands.

Researchers from the Zoological Society of London and the University of Las Palmas in the Canary Islands have found nitrogen bubbles in the tissues of stranded whales which exhibited the same effects as those of decompression sickness (DCS) in humans.

"The detailed examination of the mass stranded whales in the Canaries in 2002 suggests the naval sonar could induce a condition similar to DCS," Professor Antonio Fernandez of the University of Las Palmas said.

In early July 2004, a pod of 200 deep-water melon-headed whales stampeded into the shallow waters off Kauai, Hawaii, during U.S.-Japanese naval training exercises utilizing the high intensity sonar. In the confusion, one of the whales was stranded and died.

Post mortem examinations on some whales exposed to sonar show evidence of internal ear hemorrhaging similar to that found in divers who have suffered from the "bends" or decompression sickness, according to the science journal, Nature.

"There's a growing body of evidence that indicates intense active sonar harms marine mammals, causing them to strand, causing physical injury and disruptions," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The coalition is willing to go to court to block the Navy's continued use of the sonar, however, the National Marine Fisheries Department recently granted the Navy permission to operate its new low frequency sonar system, exempting them from the Marine Mammal Protection Act for the next five years.

The Navy offered these provisions to mitigate the effects of the sonar; to keep the sonar testing at least 12 miles away from the coast and to shut down the sonar if marine mammals are detected within 2 km of the testing area.

However, even with the provisions in place the whale deaths continue.

A mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas in 2000 has been linked to sonar testing in the area. Then, the last week in July, two dead whales washed ashore on Spain's Canary Islands, a few days after NATO exercises involving 20,000 troops and more than 20 warships occurred in the area.

"There is a strong suspicion that that their deaths were related to the NATO exercises that finished a few days ago" said Tony Gallardo, environmental expert with the government of the island of Fuerteventura, located off the southern Moroccan coast.

Even the whale watching expeditions that have become so popular have begun to harm marine mammals. Studies have shown that the noise from the boats disrupts the whale's hunting patterns, makes it harder to find food, and forces them to swim faster to get away from the boats. This causes the whales to burn off blubber, which is laden with toxins, and they end up dying from the chemicals, according to Mark Anderson, president of Orca Relief Citizen's Alliance.

Last year the Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of three other environmental and animal rights groups, won a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy, in which the Navy agreed to scale back the use of low-frequency wave technology. However, they continued the use of the mid-frequency high intensity sonar, which interferes with a marine mammal's ability to navigate, find food, communicate and avoid predators.

"Without reasonable limits, the proliferation of high intensity sonar will cause excruciating pain, injury and death for an increasing number of marine animals," said Frederick O'Regan, president of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In the last nine years there have been 10 cases of mass strandings and whale deaths associated with mid-frequency sonar testing in the coastal waters from Greece to the Canary Islands.

Researchers from the Zoological Society of London and the University of Las Palmas in the Canary Islands have found nitrogen bubbles in the tissues of stranded whales which exhibited the same effects as those of decompression sickness (DCS) in humans.

"The detailed examination of the mass stranded whales in the Canaries in 2002 suggests the naval sonar could induce a condition similar to DCS," Professor Antonio Fernandez of the University of Las Palmas said.

In early July 2004, a pod of 200 deep-water melon-headed whales stampeded into the shallow waters off Kauai, Hawaii, during U.S.-Japanese naval training exercises utilizing the high intensity sonar. In the confusion, one of the whales was stranded and died.

Post mortem examinations on some whales exposed to sonar show evidence of internal ear hemorrhaging similar to that found in divers who have suffered from the "bends" or decompression sickness, according to the science journal, Nature.

"There's a growing body of evidence that indicates intense active sonar harms marine mammals, causing them to strand, causing physical injury and disruptions," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The coalition is willing to go to court to block the Navy's continued use of the sonar, however, the National Marine Fisheries Department recently granted the Navy permission to operate its new low frequency sonar system, exempting them from the Marine Mammal Protection Act for the next five years.

The Navy offered these provisions to mitigate the effects of the sonar; to keep the sonar testing at least 12 miles away from the coast and to shut down the sonar if marine mammals are detected within 2 km of the testing area.

However, even with the provisions in place the whale deaths continue.

A mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas in 2000 has been linked to sonar testing in the area. Then, the last week in July, two dead whales washed ashore on Spain's Canary Islands, a few days after NATO exercises involving 20,000 troops and more than 20 warships occurred in the area.

"There is a strong suspicion that that their deaths were related to the NATO exercises that finished a few days ago" said Tony Gallardo, environmental expert with the government of the island of Fuerteventura, located off the southern Moroccan coast.

Even the whale watching expeditions that have become so popular have begun to harm marine mammals. Studies have shown that the noise from the boats disrupts the whale's hunting patterns, makes it harder to find food, and forces them to swim faster to get away from the boats. This causes the whales to burn off blubber, which is laden with toxins, and they end up dying from the chemicals, according to Mark Anderson, president of Orca Relief Citizen's Alliance.

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