4 What Is The Best Ph For Freshwater Aquarium

Updated on: September 2021

What Is The Best Ph For Freshwater Aquarium in 2021


API pH UP Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Raising Solution 4-Ounce Bottle

API pH UP Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Raising Solution 4-Ounce Bottle
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

API PROPER pH 8.2 Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Stabilizer 7.05-Ounce Container

API PROPER pH 8.2 Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Stabilizer 7.05-Ounce Container
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API PROPER pH 8.2 Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Stabilizer 7.05-Ounce Container
  • Sets and stabilizes water pH to 8.2 to help keep fish healthy and colorful
  • Ideal for saltwater, brackish and african cichlid aquariums
  • Use exclusively in aquariums that do not contain live plants
  • Use when setting up a new aquarium, adjusting pH in an established aquarium or changing water

API PH TEST KIT 250-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Test Kit

API PH TEST KIT 250-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Test Kit
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API PH TEST KIT 250-Test Freshwater Aquarium Water pH Test Kit, including 1 bottle of testing solution, 1 color card and 1 glass test tube with cap
  • Helps monitor and adjust pH and prevent invisible water problems that can be harmful to fish
  • Accurately reads pH 6.0 - 7.6 and helps avoid fish loss
  • Because different geographies have different tap water conditions, and different fish need different pH levels to be healthy, API helps measure pH levels & detect pH fluctuation caused by fish waste, uneaten food and addition of tap water.
  • Use for weekly monitoring and when water or fish problems appear

API pH TEST STRIPS Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water test strips 25-Count Box

API pH TEST STRIPS Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water test strips 25-Count Box
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Contains one (1) API pH TEST STRIPS Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Water test strips 25-Count Box
  • Monitors water quality and prevents pH problems that can be harmful to fish
  • Dip test strips into aquarium water and check colors for fast and accurate results
  • Helps eliminate fish stress caused by incorrect pH levels in freshwater and saltwater aquariums
  • Use for weekly monitoring and when water or fish problems appear
  • Tests wide range of pH levels
  • Desiccant lined tube provides maximum moisture protection
  • Includes instruction booklet on how to correct unsafe water conditions

Keeping Fancy Guppies as Pets: What You Should Know

I have kept and bred fancy guppies off and on for more than twenty years. According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guppy, guppies are one of the most popular freshwater aquarium species worldwide.

Guppies are easy to keep and fun to watch. They are incredibly hardy little fish. I rarely have problems with their health when changing water or cleaning the tank. They develop interesting social dynamics, and the females will bear live young roughly once a month. So, what do you need to know when considering guppies as pets?

When setting up a tank, you won't need to go beyond the basics for guppies. A tank between 10-20 gallons will work well. Add gravel, some aquatic foliage (real or fake), a pump and a heater and you're ready to go. After initially setting up your tank, it's a good idea to add a little water conditioner before adding the fish. It improves the water quality and eases their transition to their new home.

The type and selection of fancy guppies available at pet stores can vary, so don't buy your fish without looking around first. It's also a good idea to look online at the different types of guppies available (the International Fancy Guppy Association is a good place to start). One male and one female is a good start for a tank. Why so few, you may ask? For the same reason you want to look around before choosing your fish - the fish you buy will breed, and every thirty days new fry will be born. If you start with two, you will soon have more. Males and females are often kept in separate tanks at pet stores to minimize "unwanted pregnancies", and the clerks will tell you that the females have not been exposed to males and cannot be pregnant. They lie. It's probably not intentional, of course.

Guppies are resourceful little breeders. If they have ever been exposed to a male, they are likely pregnant, and can even store sperm so they automatically become pregnant after giving birth. For instance, I bought three females two weeks ago from an "all female" tank. Two of them have already given birth. So, how can you tell if you're likely buying a pregnant fish? Watching the little fry is a lot of fun, so maybe you want one who's pregnant. When guppies are pregnant, they develop a dark spot at the base of their abdomen, which grows and darkens as the pregnancy progresses. If you have any doubt, then you probably have a momma fish on your hands.

Once you get your new fish home, they should settle in nicely. I usually open the bag a tiny bit and set it in the tank, allowing some of the aquarium water to mingle with their water and giving them time to adjust to the temperature (between 78 and 80 degrees). When they are no longer showing signs of stress (jerky movements, rapid breathing) I release them into the water.

When you think your female fish are ready to give birth, you have two options. You can buy a breeder tank (a tiny floating tank that goes inside your regular tank) or you can let nature take its course. While guppy fry are born fully formed and know how to avoid danger, they look a lot like a floating piece of food. Adult guppies will eat their young. A breeding tank has a V-shaped slit that leads into a smaller bottom area.. When the fry are born, they drop down into the bottom area, where they are safe from their mother and all other fish in the tank. Unfortunately, I've found that some female fish get so stressed out being in the breeding tank that their health suffers and they refuse to give birth. In those instances, I leave the mother in the main tank and check every few hours to see if she's given birth, then scoop out the young and place them in the breeding tank. After a few weeks, they are big enough to make it on their own.

As I said before, guppies are very hardy compared to other tropical fish, but there are a couple of common problems you will need to look out for. I have run into each of these several times with my fish. The most common health issue with guppies is the common fish disease Ich, which is caused by a parasite. This is easily treatable with inexpensive medications available at any pet store, and manifests itself in small, sugar-like spots on the fish's tail or body. The second problem is more difficult to treat, and comes in the form of a nematode, or small red worm protruding from the fish's anus (yes - gross!). There is really no treatment for a nematode infestation. Remove the infected fish from the tank and, if you love it a lot, you can try anthelmintic treatment.

While every animal has it's problems, these beautiful little fish really are a lot of fun to keep, breed and watch grow. Coming home and checking on your fish, the babies and the pregnancies can be diverting and a great distraction from the business of the day.

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